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Mad Dogs

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Compare the Elegy on the Death of a Mad Dog, illustrated by Randolph Caldecott in 1879, with The Mad Dog of Potsdam, a parody written at the end of World War I.

A

B

Notes

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Click on each picture to see a larger version.

What is the dog's name on the tombstone in the Potsdam version 
(column B)?
Why?

Good people all, of every sort,
Give ear unto my song;
And if you find it wondrous short,
It cannot hold you long.

In Islington there lived a man,
Of whom the world might say,
That still a godly race he ran
Whene'er he went
to pray.

A kind and gentle heart he had,
To comfort friends and foes;
The naked every day he clad,
When he put on
his clothes.

Good people all, of every sort,
Give ear unto my song;
And if you find it wondrous short,
It cannot hold you long.

In Europe once there lived a man,
And all the world might see,
That in the human race there ran
No better man
than he.

Of all the treasures he possessed, -
A goodly lot withal, -
He valued more than all the rest
A picture on the wall.

Click here for larger picture (98 kB) Click here for larger picture (only 13 kB) Why "Potsdam"?

What is torn up at bottom RH corner of picture B?

And in that town a dog was found;
As many dogs there be -
Both mongrel, puppy, whelp, 
and hound,
And curs of low degree.
Near this good man a dog was found;
As many dogs there be -
Both bulldog, poodle, pug, 
and hound,
And curs of low degree.

Click here to enlarge and read the text too (9 kB)

Click here to enlarge (8 kB). Compare the text with the original.
This dog liked "places in the sun",
Where garden produce grew;
For haughty culture was the one
And only thing he knew.

His proper pride received a blow
Which put him in a wax:
And what d'you think disturbed him so?
A whisper - "Who said Max?"

His envious thoughts from week to week
In but one channel flew;
He longed to dam that thin grey streak,
And make it Prussian blue.

(Goldsmith's original has no equivalent verses here.  Norton adds 5 verses and Baumer adds 3 pictures.)
Click here to enlarge (only 5 kB) (To reduce download time, we have only shown one picture - sorry.)

His actions reeked of Maxims, though
The moral went astray;
To glorify the weak, you know,
A dog must have his Day.

And when at times he lost his head,
And lied to save his skin;
He wanted gas enough, they said,
To fill a Zeppelin.

This dog and man at first were friends;
But, when a pique began,
The dog, to gain some private ends,
Went mad,
This dog and man at first were friends;
But, when a pique began,
The dog, to gain some private ends,
Went mad,
(We have omitted some pictures here to save download time.  For one, click here.)
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and bit the man. and bit the man.
Click here for larger version (23 kB) ... and bit the man (parody)
Around from all the neighbouring streets
The wondering neighbours ran;
And swore the dog had lost his wits,
To bite so good a man.

The wound it seemed both sore and sad
To every christian eye;
And while they swore the dog was mad,
They swore the man would die.

But soon a wonder came to light,
That show'd the rogues they lied -
Around from all the neighbouring streets
The angry neighbours ran;
And swore they'd give the mad dog fits,
For biting such a man.

The wound it seem'd both sore and sad
To every christian eye;
And while they swore the dog was mad,
They swore the man would die.

But soon a wonder came to light,
That showed the rogues they lied -
Click here for larger version (8 kB) Click here for larger version (17 kB)
The man recover'd of the bite; The man recover'd of the bite;
The dog it was that died. Click here to enlarge (16 kB)
The dog it was that died. The dog it was that died.
 

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